Active Transportation Implementation Plan

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Consultation has concluded

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The five-year Active Transportation Implementation Plan was approved by Council at its Sept. 17 meeting.


The five-year Active Transportation Implementation Plan identifies cycling and pedestrian infrastructure, programming, and operational investments to foster a culture of active transportation in Kingston. The plan prioritizes improvements to create an integrated city-wide active transportation network, identifies opportunities to develop neighbourhood-level connections and outlines plans for programming and policy initiatives.

The Implementation Plan transforms Kingston’s Active Transportation Master Plan (ATMP) into action. The ATMP introduced the concept of city-wide and neighbourhood level infrastructure, and recognized that these two components are equally important in achieving the City’s long-term goal of having at least 20 percent of all trips within the City using active transportation. This Implementation Plan provides specific details outlining the infrastructure, neighbourhoods, programs and initiatives to be implemented over the next five years. These efforts will collectively move the City closer to its long-term modal vision and goals.

For more details on this project, see the Active Transportation Implementation Plan project page.


ATMP banner image


The five-year Active Transportation Implementation Plan was approved by Council at its Sept. 17 meeting.


The five-year Active Transportation Implementation Plan identifies cycling and pedestrian infrastructure, programming, and operational investments to foster a culture of active transportation in Kingston. The plan prioritizes improvements to create an integrated city-wide active transportation network, identifies opportunities to develop neighbourhood-level connections and outlines plans for programming and policy initiatives.

The Implementation Plan transforms Kingston’s Active Transportation Master Plan (ATMP) into action. The ATMP introduced the concept of city-wide and neighbourhood level infrastructure, and recognized that these two components are equally important in achieving the City’s long-term goal of having at least 20 percent of all trips within the City using active transportation. This Implementation Plan provides specific details outlining the infrastructure, neighbourhoods, programs and initiatives to be implemented over the next five years. These efforts will collectively move the City closer to its long-term modal vision and goals.

For more details on this project, see the Active Transportation Implementation Plan project page.


CLOSED: This discussion has concluded.

Please provided your feedback on the draft Active Transportation Implementation Plan. If you have a question or comment about the plan, submit it below. Comments will be accepted until July 19 at 4 p.m.

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    I think your plan to improve active transportation in Kingston is excellent. I have reviewed your 4 priority bicycle routes and find they will definitely meet a transportation need. There is only one part of Route 6 that I don’t feel is needed and that is along Days Road as it is easy to go north-south by cycling/walking through the adjacent neighbourhood (Henderson). I would like to know if there are any plans to work on Route 1 and why that wasn’t considered a priority. As for east-west routes it is great to work on Front Road and Taylor Kidd, but why not Bath? It is so dangerous for cyclists (and pedestrians) as there is not a continuous shoulder (or sidewalk) on either side of Bath Road starting at Sir John A Macdonald and going to Bayridge Drive. You have to cross back and forth in order to get an area to cycle on, and even then the shoulder gets very narrow in places making travel in such a busy road very dangerous. I have given up cycling along that route and am back to using my car. Thank you. Elisabeth Sorensen

    Elisabeth asked over 1 year ago

    Thanks very much for you feedback regarding the plan. The parts of route 6 you see in the Active Transportation Implementation Plan (ATIP) were taken directly from the Active Transportation Master Plan (ATMP) which was developed over the course of 2 years with extensive public consultation. However we do appreciate your feedback in regards to how neighborhood routes in this area could be used as alternative routes to the section of route 6 on Days Rd you noted. As for Route 1 it did score highly on our public engagement survey done last summer, the survey results can be found in appendix 1 of the ATIP . However the other 4 routes did score higher when ranking them overall considering: city-wide benefit, connectivity, community preference, financial aspects, integration with other projects and implementation constraints. Route 1 is a more complex project due to the cycle track facility type recommended and the space required for this facility. The ROW along Bath Rd has some space limitations currently that the city must consider moving forward. Additionally significant upgrades at the intersections will also need to be consider, therefore it is expected that additional design, consultation and possibly an environmental assessment will be required to move this route construction forward. It would also be beneficial to plan this project with future City of Kingston or Utilities Kingston projects to achieve cost savings. The City does see this route as a high priority and based on the feedback from the public last summer would expect this route to be moved forward in future implementation plans.

    Thanks again for your very insightful feedback regarding the plan and hope we have answered your questions.


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    Well done! I am impressed with the thoroughness of the ATIP and with the determination with which it is being pursued. Having lived in the cycling-friendly city of Freiburg, Germany, l feel that once the Infrastructure proposed by the ATIP is fully implemented, Kingston will compare favourably with Germany‘s greenest city. Thank you to all who have brought this document to fruition; it clearly took much work. I am excited for Kingston’s near future as a safe, sustainable and healthy city. Wondering if a broken-glass-in-the-cycling-lane reporting system could be implemented, along with prompt removal of glass? I noticed that there is/will be periodic cleaning of bike lanes, which is great, but it would be wonderful if there was a way to facilitate clean up as needed.

    Corina asked over 1 year ago

    Thank you very much for your kind words regarding the plan, the City is excited about it as well! In regards to your request about clean up of debris in bike lanes, you can always reach out to the City via the contact us portal which can be found at https://www.cityofkingston.ca/city-hall/contact-us . From here you can make make specific requests to the City and it will be forwarded to the correct department to be addressed.

    Thanks again for your feedback and interest in the Active Transportation in Kingston!

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    Let me first say that this is an incredible plan, and it's wonderfully comprehensive. If implemented extensively, I think it could do wonders to make active transportation a safer choice across the city. I wonder if specific changes to slip lanes could be accommodated to make streets safer for pedestrians. For example, the slip lanes at King and Barrie, as well as Princess at Division, can be a bit treacherous due to the speed and poor yielding by motorists. These slip lanes, and many others, would be great contenders for either a raised table or simply changing the yield signs to stop signs. However, I think the best action would be removing the slip lanes entirely, as appears to be the plan for the intersection of Railway and Montreal. Auckland's "City Centre Masterplan" (2012) includes the reduction of slip lanes to make the downtown "A walkable and pedestrian-friendly city centre" -- it may be beneficial to see how this has played out for them over the past seven years.

    Derek asked over 1 year ago

    Thanks very much for the feedback in regards to intersection design. As the City moves forward with detail design of cycling and pedestrian infrastructure identified in the plan we certainly will be looking at ways we can improve the experience for all users at the intersection. The suggestions you have made in regards to right turn channels (or slip lanes as you noted) will be noted and considered moving forward with our detailed design of projects.

    Thanks again for taking the time to read the plan and providing great feedback.

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    Hello! I'm often on the K&P on my bike, with my young son in tow. The city did a fantastic job on the trail through town. My only reservation is the Division Street section, where we're required to either get on the narrow sidewalk or ride on the busy street. As well, drivers come over the rise quickly, and are blind to riders until they are practically on top of them. Are there plans to create a safer alternative to this crossing? I would think with the 3rd river crossing impending, the K&P is going to be used a lot more, making a safe Division St crossing even more urgent. I see two possible solutions: 1) Take one of the southbound lanes and make it a 2 way lane for K&P users during the summer. Use a physical barrier to block it off. 2) Extend the trail along the railway tracks to a point near Counter and Elliott, where users would cross a pedestrian/bicycle bridge. There is a lot of space on the north side of the tracks. 2 questions regarding this: 1. Has this been considered and priced out (and discussed with CN)? 2. If the cost is the major hurdle, would the city go ahead and build one if the public were able to raise the funds (in whole or in part)?

    Darcy Dick asked over 1 year ago

    Thank you very much for your feedback on the plan. Section 5.2 - Addressing Sidewalk and Cycling Infrastructure Gaps discusses the issue you have noted. The Active Transportation Master Plan identified this crossing as a barrier, as such the City has plans to conduct an Environmental Assessment (EA). The EA process will help the City develop solutions for this issue and understand in more detail the complexities of a project like this. The construction of the solution would be part of a future implementation plan. The potential crossing location, which will be subject to the EA is also identified on figure 12 of the plan with a green box.

    Thanks again for your feedback and interest in the Active Transportation Implementation Plan

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    Will any protected bike lanes that are built be prioritized for snow and ice removal during the winter?

    nkoenig asked over 1 year ago

    Thank you very much for your feedback on the plan. Section 6.10 of the plan discusses maintenance and operations of new and existing cycling facilities moving forward. In this section it discusses how the city will work to develop a winter cycling network that would prioritize certain bike facilties for snow clearing and removal.  The winter cycling network would strive to ensure connectivity across the city, service many residents, and provide links to key destinations. The City will engage the community in determining an appropriate maintained route.

    Thanks again for your feedback and interest in the Active Transportation Implementation Plan.

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    I'm surprised not to see an option for north-south Kingston bike route (along Montreal rd. to campus for example) as this is seemingly the densest, most urbanized and area that is most likely to take advantage of active transportation by bike with this least amount of km needed. Did I miss something?

    nkoenig asked over 1 year ago

    Thank you very much for reaching out to the City of Kingston and providing your feedback. Montreal St was identified in this plan as needing new cycling infrastructure, as shown in figure 12 and table 5 of the plan. The City recently installed this new section of bike lanes on Montreal St from Rideau St to Ordnance St. The edge line has currently been painted, however the signage for the bike lanes will be installed in the coming weeks along with the bike stencils as the City finalizes its line painting around the City.

    Thanks again for your feedback and interest in the Active Transportation Implementation Plan

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    Can the bike lane be moved to Earl street?

    Ameliegabrielle asked over 1 year ago

    Thank you very much for your feedback. Earl St was identified in the Active Transportation Master Plan as a neighborhood route and is a location that the City will consider when looking at this neighborhood area in the future. As for right now the City has invested in protected bike lanes (adding flexible bollards to the existing buffered bike lanes) on Brock Street and Johnson Street  to improve the level of comfort for all users.

    Again, thank you very much for your valued feedback and interest in the Active Transportation Implementation Plan.