Your Stories, Our Histories

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Consultation has concluded


The engagement phase in the Your Stories, Our Histories project has now concluded. Thank you for taking the time to provide input into an updated cultural heritage strategy for Kingston. Staff are reviewing all input received and will report back to Council in the winter of 2020.


Kingston, as a community, has evolved and changed over time. Help us shape the exhibits, programs, and spaces that the City of Kingston creates for residents and visitors by getting involved in Your Stories, Our Histories. Your feedback may be used to identify a list of themes, issues and topics that could be used to develop future programming that includes exhibits, events and educational offerings on-site at Kingston City Hall as well as across other City-owned sites.

As a subset of the Your Stories, Our Histories project the City also invites residents to offer their perspectives on Sir John A. Macdonald and how his history and legacy can be positioned within a broader understanding of local history. Offer your insights and follow the project on the Sir John A. 360 page

Learn more about Your Stories, Our Histories on the corporate project page.

We are listening! Here is how to get involved:

In person:

  • Come chat with us! We will be in the community at special events throughout the spring and summer. Take a look at the key dates, then plan to stop by and visit with us.
  • Attend a workshop that dives into themes and ideas that matter. Sign up to express your interest and availability - we will contact you once we have finalized the dates and locations of these workshops.
  • Visit the Sir John A Macdonald room in Kingston's City Hall and leave a comment card.

Online:

  • Offer your input below. Share your story, thoughts and ideas on how we can make Kingston's history more inclusive.


The engagement phase in the Your Stories, Our Histories project has now concluded. Thank you for taking the time to provide input into an updated cultural heritage strategy for Kingston. Staff are reviewing all input received and will report back to Council in the winter of 2020.


Kingston, as a community, has evolved and changed over time. Help us shape the exhibits, programs, and spaces that the City of Kingston creates for residents and visitors by getting involved in Your Stories, Our Histories. Your feedback may be used to identify a list of themes, issues and topics that could be used to develop future programming that includes exhibits, events and educational offerings on-site at Kingston City Hall as well as across other City-owned sites.

As a subset of the Your Stories, Our Histories project the City also invites residents to offer their perspectives on Sir John A. Macdonald and how his history and legacy can be positioned within a broader understanding of local history. Offer your insights and follow the project on the Sir John A. 360 page

Learn more about Your Stories, Our Histories on the corporate project page.

We are listening! Here is how to get involved:

In person:

  • Come chat with us! We will be in the community at special events throughout the spring and summer. Take a look at the key dates, then plan to stop by and visit with us.
  • Attend a workshop that dives into themes and ideas that matter. Sign up to express your interest and availability - we will contact you once we have finalized the dates and locations of these workshops.
  • Visit the Sir John A Macdonald room in Kingston's City Hall and leave a comment card.

Online:

  • Offer your input below. Share your story, thoughts and ideas on how we can make Kingston's history more inclusive.
Consultation has concluded
  • City to host final Your Stories, Our Histories open house

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    8 months ago

    The final in-person opportunity for Kingston residents to contribute to the development of an updated cultural heritage strategy will take place on Wednesday, Dec. 11 at 6 p.m. at the Rideau Heights Community Centre (85 MacCauley St.).

    The final in-person opportunity for Kingston residents to contribute to the development of an updated cultural heritage strategy will take place on Wednesday, Dec. 11 at 6 p.m. at the Rideau Heights Community Centre (85 MacCauley St.).

  • City to begin community conversation on Sir John A. Macdonald's legacy

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    almost 2 years ago

    Beginning Sept. 6, the City of Kingston is asking residents to express how they feel about Sir John A. Macdonald's legacy. The "Your Stories, Our Histories" public engagement opportunity will launch a 2018-2019 community discussion that will help the City reflect Kingston's deep and diverse histories in its cultural exhibitions, events and programming.

    Beginning Sept. 6, the City of Kingston is asking residents to express how they feel about Sir John A. Macdonald's legacy. The "Your Stories, Our Histories" public engagement opportunity will launch a 2018-2019 community discussion that will help the City reflect Kingston's deep and diverse histories in its cultural exhibitions, events and programming.

  • Letters to the Editor: Sept. 14

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    almost 2 years ago

    Consultations about adding to our history. Source: The Kingston Whig Standard Published: Sept. 13, 2018


    Consultations about adding to our history. Source: The Kingston Whig Standard Published: Sept. 13, 2018


  • DAVID DELANEY: Sir John A. Macdonald is well worth honouring

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    almost 2 years ago

    More than any other person, first Canadian PM laid the foundation for the development of this country as one of the world’s greatest. Source: Cape Breton Post Published: Sept. 14, 2018


    More than any other person, first Canadian PM laid the foundation for the development of this country as one of the world’s greatest. Source: Cape Breton Post Published: Sept. 14, 2018


  • 'Anti-colonial vandals' deface Sir John A. Macdonald statue in Montreal

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    almost 2 years ago

    A statue of Sir John A. Macdonald in downtown Montreal was spray painted red Thursday night, the third time it has been vandalized since November. Source: CBC Published: Aug. 17, 2018

    A statue of Sir John A. Macdonald in downtown Montreal was spray painted red Thursday night, the third time it has been vandalized since November. Source: CBC Published: Aug. 17, 2018

  • 'Everyone has warts': Indigenous MP supports John A. Macdonald's name on schools

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    almost 2 years ago

    An Indigenous MP, who called for the renaming of Ottawa's Langevin Block because of its namesake's role in the creation of the residential school system, said he does not feel the same way about stripping the name of Canada's first prime minister from public schools. Source: CBC News. Published: Aug. 27, 2017

    An Indigenous MP, who called for the renaming of Ottawa's Langevin Block because of its namesake's role in the creation of the residential school system, said he does not feel the same way about stripping the name of Canada's first prime minister from public schools. Source: CBC News. Published: Aug. 27, 2017

  • Here is what Sir John A. Macdonald did to Indigenous people

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    almost 2 years ago

    Right now, Canada is experiencing another spasm of controversy over the legacy of its first prime minister, John A. Macdonald. Although he undoubtedly laid the foundations of modern Canada, he also personally set in motion all the most damaging elements of Canadian Indigenous policy. Source: National Post. Published: Aug. 28, 2018

    Right now, Canada is experiencing another spasm of controversy over the legacy of its first prime minister, John A. Macdonald. Although he undoubtedly laid the foundations of modern Canada, he also personally set in motion all the most damaging elements of Canadian Indigenous policy. Source: National Post. Published: Aug. 28, 2018

  • Laura Murray: Let's do what Macdonald didn't

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    almost 2 years ago

    Sir John A. Macdonald’s 200th birthday is upon us. Across Canada, celebrations are afoot; at the Historica-Dominion Institute’s SirJohnADay website you can even print out a party hat. Source: Ottawa Citizen. Published: Jan 9, 2013

    Sir John A. Macdonald’s 200th birthday is upon us. Across Canada, celebrations are afoot; at the Historica-Dominion Institute’s SirJohnADay website you can even print out a party hat. Source: Ottawa Citizen. Published: Jan 9, 2013

  • Niigaan Sinclair: Stop apologizing for John A. Macdonald

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    almost 2 years ago

    Canadians are waking up to the contributions Indigenous peoples have made, and are making, to this country’s identity. Celebrating men like Sir John A. Macdonald doesn’t do this. Source: Ottawa Citizen. Published: January 9, 2015

    Canadians are waking up to the contributions Indigenous peoples have made, and are making, to this country’s identity. Celebrating men like Sir John A. Macdonald doesn’t do this. Source: Ottawa Citizen. Published: January 9, 2015

  • Beware the dominoes from toppling statues

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    almost 2 years ago

    Two down, 11 statues still standing. That’s how many can be found of our founder, Sir John A. Macdonald, across Canada, after Victoria city hall banished his visage in a gesture of “truth and reconciliation” with Indigenous people. Source: Our Windsor. Published: Aug. 28, 2018


    Two down, 11 statues still standing. That’s how many can be found of our founder, Sir John A. Macdonald, across Canada, after Victoria city hall banished his visage in a gesture of “truth and reconciliation” with Indigenous people. Source: Our Windsor. Published: Aug. 28, 2018