Multi-Year Accessibility Plan

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row of accessibility icons including ASL, service animal, cane, mobility

The City of Kingston is committed to creating an inclusive environment for residents of all abilities. The Multi-Year Accessibility Plan is what the City of Kingston follows to prevent and remove barriers to accessibility and is required under the Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act (AODA). The plan builds on the City’s success of meeting the legislative requirements and vision of going above and beyond to make municipal services and facilities accessible and inclusive.

The current plan ends in 2022, and we are asking for input on two key components:

  • ideas the City could implement to remove barriers for people with disabilities
  • feedback from residents, community groups and City staff on the draft plan

Keep in mind, the City of Kingston Multi-Year Accessibility Plan covers only City facilities, services, and public places. Private businesses, their physical layout, and services, are under the jurisdiction of the province under the AODA and the Ontario Building Code.

Review the City's accessibility goals for 2023-2025 and share your feedback.

Accessible public engagement

  1. Offer feedback here on Get Involved Kingston.
  2. Request an alternate format of any communications and public engagement documents by calling 613-546-0000 or emailing contactus@cityofkingston.ca
  3. Offer your feedback by mail. Call 613-546-0000 to request a postage paid and pre-addressed envelope.
  4. Offer feedback by phone by calling 613-546-0000 and speak to a Customer Experience Agent.


row of accessibility icons including ASL, service animal, cane, mobility

The City of Kingston is committed to creating an inclusive environment for residents of all abilities. The Multi-Year Accessibility Plan is what the City of Kingston follows to prevent and remove barriers to accessibility and is required under the Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act (AODA). The plan builds on the City’s success of meeting the legislative requirements and vision of going above and beyond to make municipal services and facilities accessible and inclusive.

The current plan ends in 2022, and we are asking for input on two key components:

  • ideas the City could implement to remove barriers for people with disabilities
  • feedback from residents, community groups and City staff on the draft plan

Keep in mind, the City of Kingston Multi-Year Accessibility Plan covers only City facilities, services, and public places. Private businesses, their physical layout, and services, are under the jurisdiction of the province under the AODA and the Ontario Building Code.

Review the City's accessibility goals for 2023-2025 and share your feedback.

Accessible public engagement

  1. Offer feedback here on Get Involved Kingston.
  2. Request an alternate format of any communications and public engagement documents by calling 613-546-0000 or emailing contactus@cityofkingston.ca
  3. Offer your feedback by mail. Call 613-546-0000 to request a postage paid and pre-addressed envelope.
  4. Offer feedback by phone by calling 613-546-0000 and speak to a Customer Experience Agent.
CLOSED: This discussion has concluded.

Do you have questions about the draft Multi-Year Accessibility Plan? We invite you to review the draft plan under the ‘Related documents’ tab on the right, and to share your questions and/or feedback below with City staff.

As a reminder, the City of Kingston Multi-Year Accessibility Plan covers only City facilities, services, and public places. Staff will not respond to questions that do not adhere to the City’s Guidelines for Public Participation or that are unrelated to this work.

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    I have a few separate points I would like to make 1) City Recreation facilities should be designed with disabilities in mind. I feel this one goes without saying, and two, should extend to all City buildings. However, I feel it is most important at City Recreation facilities. The accessibility ramps at Artillery Park and Rideau Heights are very poorly designed. They are far too narrow to accommodate large wheel chairs and have far too many sharp twists. I have watch Extend-A-Family struggle up the ramp at Artillery Park to bring their large groups of both physically and mentally disabled clients. The reason, the ramp was an afterthought. Ramps, doorways, hallways, and front desk should be designed with disabilities in mind. 2) Intersections. As a City employee I have heard this complain a few times before. Many of the new intersections have been constructed with a focus of bike lanes. This is great; however, this should not come at a cost to though with physical disabilities. If a blind/ seeing impaired person is waiting at the corner, they should not have to worry about a bike lane cutting through the sidewalk right on the corner. This is a serious safety hazard. This same issue would also affect those waiting to cross in a wheelchair, as both these groups would not be able to quickly/ easy move for a cyclist. Please thing about both cyclist and those with disabilities when designing intersection. Everyone's safety is important. 3) Lastly, e-learning. The City's e-learning platform is not compatible with Google Chrome's accessibility features. The platform as a whole is not very accommodating to those with learning disabilities, however, the fact that it does not allow Chrome accessibility features to work upsets me the most. I have brought this point up several time over the last 7 years I have been with the City. And so far, nothing has been done. Overall, most citizens with disabilities do not care about big shows or PR events of new accessibility features at one off locations. They/ we care about being thought of when designing and planning new projects, programs, and buildings.

    Argei asked 4 months ago

    Hello and thank you for your comments; they will be passed along to the appropriate City departments.

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    Why is improving safety for cyclists considered outside of scope for municipal accessibility? It is part of both Public Space and Transportation, which are AODA standards. Disabled cyclists—especially those of us who are too disabled to drive—are stuck between being unable to use the unprotected on-road bike lanes, and yet not technically allowed to use the sidewalk. A bike is key to getting to transit stops; I can only manage a few metres at a time with the canes but several hundred metres on the bike, enough to make that connection, if the facilities are smooth and connected. Otherwise, I'm stuck at home, blocked from my community. To suggest in this report that disabled people cannot also be cyclists is an example of implicit ableism.

    1mq asked 5 months ago

    Thank you for your comments. By way of explanation, comments regarding safe cycling infrastructure were considered out of scope as the Transportation and Design of Public Spaces standard do not contain specific requirements regarding cycling infrastructure. That being said, it is understood that the exclusion of safe cycling infrastructure from consideration disregards that persons with disabilities use cycling infrastructure and the importance of creating safe cycling infrastructure. The final report will recognize this fact.

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    Good progress has been made but as partner of a mobility impaired man I notice lots of barriers ... lack of righr-height toilets, power door buttons that don't work, exterior toilets at new KECC that could be great for him but are always locked, construction sites that make access for pick up difficult, street closues eg on Ontario St in front of St Lawrence Place such that I am unable to pick up my 103 yr old Mom, new patios which decrease parking which means people who need VERY CLOSE parking can no longer enjoy access to restaurants etc. It's a never-ending sadness to observe how some people just have diminished opportunities to participate in community life.

    Liz Huff asked 5 months ago

    Thank you for your comments. The City is working to remove and prevent barriers to accessibility, and if residents encounter an accessibility barrier, they are encouraged to report the barrier through the City's website.

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    Please, for the love of god, create accessible washrooms (especially where washrooms already exist) year round so ALL people can enjoy our city spaces no matter the weather.

    alisonpitcher asked 5 months ago

    Thank you for your comment. The draft plan identifies an upcoming project for the creation of an interactive map that will detail accessibility features in the City facilities, including the location of publicly-accessible washrooms. As part of facility construction and upgrades, accessible washrooms are being added in City facilities in according with the Ontario Building Code and the City's Facility Accessibility Design Standards.

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    One of the most pressing issues regarding accessible transportation in Kingston is that city busses do not adequately reach Providence Care Hospital. The closest bus stop to the hospital is Portsmouth/King St, which is approximately 600m from the hospital's front entrance. This distance is prohibitive for many people who have mobility impairments. Consequently, many are left having to arrange other means of transportation, which is often challenging, not least because of having to pay additional costs. Providence Care Hospital is a key facility in our community that specifically focuses on serving those with mobility impairments. Therefore, please consider changing the bus routes so that everyone can attend medical appointments and visit loved ones at Providence Care Hospital. Thank you.

    SD asked 5 months ago

    Thank you for the comment. This comment will passed along to the appropriate staff.

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    I'm curious about the suggestion to "reduce telephone barriers when contacting a medical practitioner". What are the telephone barriers being experienced? Are there medical practitioners who work for the city and would therefore be covered by this? (i.e. will this refer to doctors at the hospitals?) Thank you. Mary Lou Boudreau

    marylouboudreau asked 5 months ago

    Hello and thank you for the question. This question was included in the draft report as it was received as part of an earlier engagement on the project. This topic is out of scope for the Multi-Year Accessibility Plan as the City does not have a service role in this area.

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    Public engagement data indicates that half of all questions were related to design of public spaces, and the plan specifies that "Design of public spaces ideas were primarily related to improving sidewalk plowing and snow removal". However, the actual goals for plan do not address snow clearing. Would the City consider revising the plan to make explicit plans around snow clearing efforts?

    Derek asked 5 months ago

    Thank you for the question. Yes, based on the feedback received you will see more details regarding snow plowing and removal in the final plan.

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    Can I use my electric scooter on the KFL&A trail?

    automan22 asked 6 months ago

    Yes, all mobility devices can be used on the K&P Trail. Only motorized vehicles are prohibited (except farm vehicles).

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    I'd like to add my support to the idea of prioritizing/improving sidewalk plowing and snow removal.

    hbeattie asked 5 months ago

    Excellent, thank you for the feedback!

Page last updated: 12 Aug 2022, 11:10 AM