Third Crossing - Gore Road & Highway 15

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The Third Crossing project team is releasing the final design of Highway 15 and Gore Rd intersection for residents to view and ask questions of the project team.

In September 2019, the Third Crossing project team provided a draft concept design of Hwy 15 & Gore Rd intersection. Since then, there have been City-wide decisions based on global and municipal interests which have influenced the final design.

The purpose of this Q&A (see below) is to allow residents to review the evolution of the intersection design and see how the final design is focussed on active transportation and transit improvements. Residents can view the final design in the News Feed section below or by opening the pdf slides and then ask questions you may have of the project team.

The Highway 15 Class EA

This engagement is not about the Hwy 15 Class Environmental Assessment (Class EA) that looked at the current and future transportation needs of pedestrians, cyclists, transit users, and motorists along the Highway 15 corridor. For further information about the Hwy 15 Class EA, visit the Highway 15 project page.



The Third Crossing project team is releasing the final design of Highway 15 and Gore Rd intersection for residents to view and ask questions of the project team.

In September 2019, the Third Crossing project team provided a draft concept design of Hwy 15 & Gore Rd intersection. Since then, there have been City-wide decisions based on global and municipal interests which have influenced the final design.

The purpose of this Q&A (see below) is to allow residents to review the evolution of the intersection design and see how the final design is focussed on active transportation and transit improvements. Residents can view the final design in the News Feed section below or by opening the pdf slides and then ask questions you may have of the project team.

The Highway 15 Class EA

This engagement is not about the Hwy 15 Class Environmental Assessment (Class EA) that looked at the current and future transportation needs of pedestrians, cyclists, transit users, and motorists along the Highway 15 corridor. For further information about the Hwy 15 Class EA, visit the Highway 15 project page.


CLOSED: This discussion has concluded.

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    Hi - On 19 June I cheekily asked two questions: thank you for your helpful response, but I received only one answer, so to re-ask my second question. || I cycle a lot. So far, I have found approximately 15 sets of traffic lights in downtown Kingston which never turn green if you are alone on a push bike, apparently because your systems cannot detect bikes, only cars and trucks. Will this new intersection be correctly set-up to detect bikes, or will we be forced to run the red lights like on those other 15 sets of traffic lights? Thank you - Jon

    jondclarke asked 16 days ago

    Hi Jondclarke, 

    Apologies for missing that second question. To answer this question and provide clarity, yes, the intersection improvements will include detection for and dedicated signals for bicycles. 

    Thank you

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    Even though Point St Mark Drive and the library are midway between the Third Crossing and Highway 15 along Gore Road they are not indicated on the June 2020-Final Design. The potential for an extremely significant increase in traffic to this quiet residential area needs to be addressed and should be part to any Final design. Point St Mark should not be made into a high speed shortcut for those wishing to shave a few seconds off their daily commute when Hwy 15 is congested. As a result of the pandemic and it’s devastating financial affect on the City’s ability to fund traffic mitigation measures in Point St Mark will the existing Third Crossing budget be used? I would like to offer one possible solution. Would it not be the least expensive solution to close off Point St Mark with a semi-permanent yet removable barrier, such as those on ramps to Hwy 401? This barrier would remain closed but could be removed for emergencies. With such a barrier in place there would be no need for neither a west nor east turn lane on Gore to Point St Mark thereby reducing the cost the Third Crossing. Possible?

    G.L. asked 14 days ago

    Hi G.L. 

    Thank you for sharing your feedback. In terms of Point St. Mark Drive and Gore Rd a decision on that intersection has not been made yet. We will be reaching out to residents in the near future for their opinions on keeping the intersection permanently open or closed and other feedback as well. The project team will be reaching out in 2020.

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    Would a cyclist still be allowed to cross the intersection together with the motor vehicles when their light is green? I assume the lights for the motor vehicles will be on green much longer and when I feel confident it is safe, I might not like to wait (especially when I am on my exercise ride).

    Maarten Beek asked 14 days ago

    Hi Maarten, 

    Thank you for your question. Depending on your cycling experience at the intersection you can cross it in a couple of ways, you could:

    • If you are coming off the bridge by using the multi-use pathway, stay on the multi-use pathway until the intersection and then use the cross-rides at the intersection of Hwy 15. You can follow the traffic signals to cross the road using the designated cross-rides;
    • You can also enter the car lanes at the Point St Mark intersection and cycle in the car lane and then enter the left-turn car lane and flow with car traffic.
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    1. Gore Rd West side: As someone who walks, three footpaths seems excessive. (one on north side, two on south side - including the multi use trail). 2. Gore Rd East: Why is a natural desire-line path from the bus stop to the sidewalk seemingly overlooked. 3. Why do road engineers seem to believe cyclists and pedestrians love trails close to busy noisy roads?

    PeterGB asked 14 days ago

    Hi Peter, 

    Thank you for your question although we hope you can expand further on your question as we are not completely clear as to what you are asking. As engagement closes today at 4 p.m. you can always email the Third Crossing project team with your question at any time. Email us and you would be happy to answer any questions you have. Email at thirdcrossing@cityofkingston.ca 

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    A quick one: the cross-rides, are that the dotted lines in the drawing?

    Maarten Beek asked 14 days ago

    Hi Maarten, 

    Yes, they are - the cross-rides are the dotted lines in the images of the final design.

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    The new design has lanes called Cycle facility. Looking at the drawings they look quite narrow. Would there still be a possibility for cyclists to pass each other?

    Maarten Beek asked 14 days ago

    Hi Maarten, 

    Thank you for your question. The typical width of cycling lanes (on-road) is 1.5 meters with a 0.5 meter buffer zone.  The multi-use pathway will be 3.0 meters wide.  As always, we all need to share the road, drive/cycle safely and use courtesy when approaching other cyclists/car drivers on these routes.

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    In a post-COVID society, we can anticipate that many will be working from home resulting in a lot less commuter pressure. In this setting, is a third crossing necessary? The $180 million could be used for substantial improvements to our existing infrastructure. A renewed focus on sustainable transportation, including separate bike lanes and widened sidewalks which benefit people of all mobilities could be a more equitable option and a better use of funds. It is not too late to reconsider. Consider the following articles: “Let’s use what COVID-19 has taught us to redesign the city” Toon Dreessen https://ottawacitizen.com/opinion/dreessen-lets-use-what-covid-19-has-taught-us-to-redesign-our-city “Milan announces ambitious scheme to reduce car use after lockdown” Laura Laker https://www.theguardian.com/world/2020/apr/21/milan-seeks-to-prevent-post-crisis-return-of-traffic-pollution

    spatel asked 15 days ago

    Hi Spatel, 

    Thanks for your question. Funding was approved and granted by upper levels of government (the Province and the Federal Government) and the construction of the Third Crossing is already underway.

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    Are the maple trees on Gore Rd. across from the Pittsburgh library going to have to be cut down to accommodate the width of the road entering the bridge from the east? Thanks.

    Richards asked 15 days ago

    Hi Richard, 

    Thank you for your question. If you are referring to the trees along Gore Road east of Point St Mark to Hwy 15 (south side), the majority of trees will be left alone and not cut down, but there are a couple of trees that require removal.  The road widening happens north of these trees.

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    Not sure if this is the forum to ask this question. As the third crossing will be vital to reduce congestion if there is an accident or other problem with the 401 between hwy 15 and Montreal St or the LaSalle causeway. Will there be changes to the timing of lights or lane closures to allow transport trucks to navigate the various intersections better? The lack of turning lanes or lights at some of the on and off ramps and intersections really slow things down.

    Bill D asked 16 days ago

    Hi Bill, 

    Thank you for the question. Signal timings are coordinated throughout the City. Depending on the equipment installed at intersections, it can vary between smart systems and timed systems.  If smart systems are equipped along Emergency Detour Routes, they will be activated/adjusted to increase operational enhancements during these types of events.

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    As a bicycle commuter I am worried how I should take my left turn from Gore onto hwy 15. Do I start on the shared use path and then crossover to the left turn lane?

    Heidi Ploeg asked 16 days ago

    Hi Heidi, 

    Thank you for the question. Depending on your cycling experience, you can take a left turn from Gore Rd onto Hwy 15 a couple of ways:

    • If you are coming off the bridge by using the multi-use pathway, stay on the multi-use pathway until the intersection and then use the cross-rides at the intersection of Hwy 15. You can follow the traffic signals to cross the road using the designated cross-rides;
    • You can also enter the car lanes at the Point St Mark intersection and cycle in the car lane and then enter the left-turn car lane and flow with car traffic.
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    Why was the east bound bike lane removed? Will there be sharrows on the road lanes for cyclists?

    Heidi Ploeg asked 16 days ago

    Hi Heidi, 

    Thanks for your question. The east bound cycling lane that was on-road has been upgraded to be off-road in the new multi-use pathway.  There are no planned sharrows at this time.

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    We approach the Library on foot from Point St. Mark. Can one cross the multi traffic lanes to enter the Library premises. There is a lovely stone wall abutting the Library parking lot. We do hope that feature will be preserved.

    Shirley Anne Harmer asked 21 days ago

    Hi Shirley, 

    Thank you for your question.

    The current design for the intersection of Point St Mark and the relocated Library entrance will include pedestrian-activated signals that will stop traffic on Gore Road to allow residents to cross the street to get to the Library.  In regards to the stone wall, the majority of the heritage stone wall will remain untouched; however, up to 16 meters of the southern portion of the wall will be properly dismantled and then re-assembled by a heritage stone mason.  

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    I just wanted to congratulate the Third Crossing team on such a great modern intersection design. This design cements the city's commitment to sustainable transportation. Usually I am a little nitpicky about intersection design, but I have no criticism here, you guys knocked it out of the park. Now just copy and paste this design all over Kingston!

    Bkol asked 24 days ago

    Hi Bkol, 

    Thank you for taking the time to send in your comment. We appreciate hearing from you.

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    1) I cycle a lot. I've found about 15 sets of traffic lights so far in Kingston that never go green if you're alone on a push bike. Will the traffic lights actually be set-up so cyclists can use them safely, or are you going to force us to run the red lights as usual? 2) On the K&P Trail, you instruct cyclists to dismount at every intersection. (You don't force motorists to get out of their cars and trucks, so why force us to do this?) Will we be allowed to cycle across this in a bike lane, or are you going to force us to walk like the K&P? Despite my pointed questions, I'm really glad that you're shifting the city towards more sustainable, healthier modes.

    jondclarke asked 28 days ago

    Hi Jondclark, 

    Thank you for your question and your comment. This intersection design includes dedicated cycling crossings called cross-rides.  Cross-rides allow cyclists to remain on their bikes and safely cross the intersection in a space dedicated to them, separate from vehicles and pedestrians.  A signal, specifically for cyclists, indicates when you can cross safely.

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    I note that the cycle facilities on the northwest and southeast corners of the intersection are between the roadway and the bus stop. Will that not present a potential danger for transit users? I'm both a cyclist and bus rider, so I can see the difficulty of where to put the cycle path, but I worry about the potential for unpleasant cyclist and bus rider interactions. Or is there a way to indicate (and force?) cyclists to give way to the pedestrians as one would expect?

    rob asked 28 days ago

    Hi Rob, 

    This configuration represents an overall improvement for cyclists as the facility is off-road and there is no interaction with vehicle or buses that may be approaching or stopped on-road at the transit stop.  Bus riders do need to cross the cycling lane to board the bus; however, the pedestrian and bus stop waiting areas will be delineated separately from the cycling facility so that it will not be a shared space.

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    What is the 'transit queue hopping' mechanism? I don't see a buses only lane before the intersection - how will they get ahead of the private vehicles? Relatedly, if the stops are placed after the intersection, aren't the buses jumping the traffic queue only to stop immediately afterwards?

    Matt McTaggart asked 28 days ago

    Hi Matt, 

    Thank you for your question.

    The transit queue hop shares the vehicle right turn lane on the near-side (approach to the intersection).  Vehicles that are ahead of the bus clear the lane as they make right turns which brings the bus to the front of the queue.  Buses wait at the stop bar and proceed straight through the intersection to the receiving transit-only bay on the far side of the intersection.  The bus moves through the intersection on a green signal or on a transit-only signal that allows the bus to proceed through the intersection ahead of other vehicles in the adjacent lanes.  

    While a bus stop on the far-side of the intersection may delay bus arrival at the stop in some instances this is mitigated in this design by ensuring the bus is at the front of the vehicle queue.  It also ensures that buses arriving at the intersection on a green signal proceed directly through rather than stopping in the right turn lane which minimizes the bus stopping on a green signal and probability of the signal changing to red before the proceeding through the intersection.  Far-side placement of a transit stop can also enhance safety for riders by encouraging crossing at the intersection behind the bus.

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    I am not clear about vehicle access to the library in the final design. Could you please clarify how one will drive into the library parking lot? Thank you.

    anitabl asked 28 days ago

    Hi Anitabl, 

    Thank you for your question.  The library entrance will be a typical driveway that connects to a road.  The driveway will extend to tie into the existing library parking lot.  The driveway entrance will line up with the Point St Mark Drive.

    Thank you

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    Hi there, I live down on Kenwoods Circle. I was wondering if Point Saint Mark Drive will open onto Gore Rd. in one or both directions once the bridge is complete?

    Richards asked 28 days ago

    Hi Richards, 

    Thank you for taking the time and posting a question. We did have a similar question if you want to see for more context, but a decision has not been made. The project team will be re-engaging residents in the Point St. Mark neighbourhood to gather feedback on the Gore Rd and Point St Mark Drive intersection. The Third Crossing project team will be reaching out to residents in 2020 to gather feedback.

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    Hi, will the end of the Greenwood Park trail be extended along Gore rd? in the form of a multi use lane? Thank you

    Jennifer Lalonde asked 28 days ago

    Hi Jennifer, 


    Thank you for your question.  To answer your question simply no, there will not be. Although there is a proposed multi-use pathway along the south side of Gore Road from the bridge to Hwy 15.  The design doesn’t illustrate an actual multi-use pathway but rather a connection to the existing sidewalks on the northeast and southeast corners of Hwy 15 @ Gore Road.  

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    Could you please confirm the Point Saint Mark Drive - Gore Road access? Earlier, there was to be no eastbound access to PSMD coming off the bridge and no westbound access off PSMD onto Gore to cross the bridge. There was to be eastbound access off of PSMD onto Gore and the slides seem to confirm that with access to the library left turn lane. Please confirm.

    Arthur Jordan asked 28 days ago

    Hi Arthur, 

    Thank you for your question. In the summer of 2019, the west entrance to Point St. Mark Dr. (PSM) at Gore Rd. was closed for vehicle traffic in an effort to safely protect residents from construction activity, the closure is required for the duration of construction. The west entrance of Gore Rd. and Point St. Mark Dr. will remain closed for the duration of construction and no decision has been made at this point regarding the permanent closure of PSM access at the intersection. We will continue to collect additional traffic data as needed throughout the project that will be useful to help make any decisions on the final design of this intersection along with additional public engagement with residents.

      The project team will be re-engaging residents in the Point St. Mark neighbourhood to gather feedback on the Gore Rd and Point St Mark Drive intersection. The Third Crossing project team will be reaching out to residents in 2020 to gather feedback.

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    Hi, I am wondering what the road will look like coming east over the bridge toward highway 15. Will there be access to Point St. Mark Drive? I am concerned that if there is direct access coming off the bridge, that it will increase the traffic in the neighbourhood, especially as traffic is bottlenecked on highway 15 between Gore and Grenadier/Point St. Mark on weekday mornings. I would prefer that drivers not use my street as a detour to avoid the bottleneck. I couldn't find pictures of the plan for this existing intersection. Please advise.

    Deanna asked 28 days ago

    Hi Deanna, 

    Thank you for your question.

    In the summer of 2019, the west entrance to Point St. Mark Dr. at Gore Rd. was closed for vehicle traffic in an effort to safely protect residents from construction activity, the closure is required for the duration of construction. The west entrance of Gore Rd. and Point St. Mark Dr. will remain closed for the duration of construction and no decision has been made at this point regarding the permanent closure of this intersection. We will continue to collect additional traffic data as needed throughout the project that will be useful to help make any decisions on the final design of this intersection along with additional public engagement with residents.

    To understand the effects of the closure, the City conducted traffic monitoring in the Point St. Mark neighbourhood to measure the pre- and post-closure conditions of Point St. Mark Dr. These measurements showed that the average speeds remained relatively the same (41km/h to 43 km/h) and average daily vehicle volume (the number of vehicles using Point St. Mark Drive) increased from 347 to 549 vehicles. This increase in vehicles using the Point St. Mark Dr. is expected as all the neighbourhood traffic must use the southern Grenadier Rd. intersection during the Gore Rd. closure. The project team will be re-engaging residents in the Point St. Mark neighbourhood to gather feedback on the Gore Rd and Point St Mark Drive intersection. The Third Crossing project team will be reaching out to residents in 2020 to gather feedback.

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    This is a little late in the process to ask, but was a "round-a-bout" considered for this intersection in lieu of yet another signaled intersection in the City of Kingston?

    G.J. asked 27 days ago

    Hi G.J. 

    Thank you for posting your question. Yes. A round-about was analyzed at this intersection at Hwy 15 during the draft Hwy 15 Environmental Assessment process but due to the sheer size of the round-about in conjunction with land acquisition needed (private property purchases) made it undesirable when compared to a standard signalized intersection.

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    One traffic safety related question; looking at the map/diagram, is there going to be any description of traffic control around the library? If I wanted to go from the library towards the Base during high traffic times, I would need to cross up to five lines in what could be a short distance. I haven't factored in pedestrians or cyclists yet.

    Don asked 28 days ago

    Hi Don, 

    Thank you for your question. The traffic operations at the Library entrance intersection may require movements across multiple lanes.  At this time, there are signals proposed at the Library entrance so movements will be protected via signalization. The signalization may not be required if the south portion of this intersection (being Point St Mark) remains closed after construction is completed. The project team will be re-engaging residents in the Point St. Mark neighbourhood to gather feedback on the Gore Rd and Point St Mark Drive intersection. The Third Crossing project team will be reaching out to residents in 2020 to gather feedback.