Williamsville Bikeways

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Consultation has concluded, the engagement report is available online.

Decorative image showing a cartoon style graphic depiction of a multiuse pathway next to a neighbourhood road and sidewalk with a tree lined street. Pedestrians are pictured walking and running, there are families and children, a cyclist and a wheelchair user.

Williamsville is a historic, growing and active neighbourhood that is located between downtown and central Kingston. A key part of what contributes to its character is the high use of active modes of transportation, such as walking or biking. Recently we carried out some public engagement on a transportation study in Williamsville. During that engagement, we heard that community members wanted to see infrastructure built to support cycling along commonly used routes in the neighbourhood. One of the big themes brought forward were concerns about barriers cycling those routes.

In order to support the growth of bikeway transportation networks in Williamsville we need to hear from the community about what routes are vital and why. This information will be used to develop recommended concepts. Those concepts could then be used in the future as Williamsville grows and develops.

A public open house took place on Oct. 26 from 6 - 8 p.m. The informational materials from that event can be viewed online. A survey was conducted during the Oct. 26 in-person open house, for those who were unable to attend but wanted to leave feedback an online version was accessible until Nov. 17

More on Williamsville transportation

Decorative image showing a cartoon style graphic depiction of a multiuse pathway next to a neighbourhood road and sidewalk with a tree lined street. Pedestrians are pictured walking and running, there are families and children, a cyclist and a wheelchair user.

Williamsville is a historic, growing and active neighbourhood that is located between downtown and central Kingston. A key part of what contributes to its character is the high use of active modes of transportation, such as walking or biking. Recently we carried out some public engagement on a transportation study in Williamsville. During that engagement, we heard that community members wanted to see infrastructure built to support cycling along commonly used routes in the neighbourhood. One of the big themes brought forward were concerns about barriers cycling those routes.

In order to support the growth of bikeway transportation networks in Williamsville we need to hear from the community about what routes are vital and why. This information will be used to develop recommended concepts. Those concepts could then be used in the future as Williamsville grows and develops.

A public open house took place on Oct. 26 from 6 - 8 p.m. The informational materials from that event can be viewed online. A survey was conducted during the Oct. 26 in-person open house, for those who were unable to attend but wanted to leave feedback an online version was accessible until Nov. 17

More on Williamsville transportation

Consultation has concluded, the engagement report is available online.

  • Bike route maps and cross-sections

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    Below are reference images including two maps outlining current and planned routes as well as proposed routes. There are also cross-section drawings showing planned typical bike infrastructure that could be built.

    Route maps

    Tap or click on the images below to open at full resolution in a new tab.

    A map showing the existing cycling routes and facilities in the Williamsville area.

    The map above illustrates the Williamsville neighbourhood and shows the different types of bike or cycling infrastructure that is planned or in place.

    A map showing the proposed neighbourhood bikeway routes that may be implemented in the Williamsville area based on public feedback received.

    The map above illustrates the Williamsville neighbourhood and shows the different proposed routes through the neighbourhood based on public feedback.

    Cross-sections

    These images show what the different types of bike infrastructure or cycling facilities would be used to support the neighbourhood routes. Tap or click on the images below to open at full resolution in a new tab.

    shows a proposed cross-section for Mack Street, Napier Street, and Nelson Street with signage and pavement markings for a shared travel lane for cyclists and vehicles.

    The cross-section above shows a proposed cross-section for Mack Street, Napier Street, and Nelson Street with signage and pavement markings for a shared travel lane for cyclists and vehicles.

    Shows a proposed cross-section for Mack Street, Napier Street, and Nelson Street that includes traffic calming bump outs with signage and pavement markings for a shared travel lane for cyclists and vehicles.

    The cross-section above shows a proposed cross-section for Mack Street, Napier Street, and Nelson Street that includes traffic calming bump outs with signage and pavement markings for a shared travel lane for cyclists and vehicles..

    shows a proposed cross-section for College Street, Park Street, Alfred Street Albert Street, Mack Street, and Nelson Street with signage and pavement markings for a shared travel lane for cyclists and vehicles.

    The cross-section above shows a proposed cross-section for College Street, Park Street, Alfred Street Albert Street, Mack Street, and Nelson Street with signage and pavement markings for a shared travel lane for cyclists and vehicles.

    shows a proposed cross-section for College Street, Park Street, Alfred Street Albert Street, Mack Street, and Nelson Street that includes traffic calming bump outs with signage and pavement markings for a shared travel lane for cyclists and vehicles.

    The cross-section above shows a proposed cross-section for College Street, Park Street, Alfred Street Albert Street, Mack Street, and Nelson Street that includes traffic calming bump outs with signage and pavement markings for a shared travel lane for cyclists and vehicles.

    shows a proposed cross-section for Alfred Street with signage and pavement markings for Advisory Bike Lanes with on-street parking on one side of the road.

    The cross-section above shows a proposed cross-section for Alfred Street with signage and pavement markings for Advisory Bike Lanes with on-street parking on one side of the road.

    shows a proposed cross-section for Macdonnell Street with signage and pavement markings for a shared travel lane for cyclists and vehicles.

    The cross-section above shows a proposed cross-section for Macdonnell Street with signage and pavement markings for a shared travel lane for cyclists and vehicles.

    shows a proposed cross-section for Macdonnell Street that includes traffic calming bump outs with signage and pavement markings for a shared travel lane for cyclists and vehicles.

    The cross-section above shows a proposed cross-section for Macdonnell Street that includes traffic calming bump outs with signage and pavement markings for a shared travel lane for cyclists and vehicles.

    shows a proposed cross-section for Macdonnell Street with signage and pavement markings for Advisory Bike Lanes with on-street parking on one side of the road.

    The cross-section above shows a proposed cross-section for Macdonnell Street with signage and pavement markings for Advisory Bike Lanes with on-street parking on one side of the road.

  • Notice of public open house

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    Community members are invited to a Public Open House at St. Luke’s Anglican Church (236 Nelson St.) on Oct. 26. The event is a drop-in style open house and community members may come by anytime between 6 p.m. and 8 p.m.

    This open house is being hosted to present additional information based on the community engagement completed in the spring. It is particularly focused on the transportation priorities and concepts along Princess Street, between Division and Concession Street, also known as Williamsville Mainstreet.

    Community members can learn about the study’s analysis completed to date, view the concepts that have been developed and ask questions of technical experts. Staff from the City of Kingston will also be seeking feedback on how to improve neighbourhood bike routes in the Williamsville area.

    Feedback received during the open house will be used in the study process to refine options for the community to consider. In January a first draft report on transportation options, including the feedback received through the study, will be released for more public comment. That feedback will be used to further refine the report before it goes to City Council and committee in February 2024.

    Background

    In the spring of 2023, the City of Kingston began the second phase of a transportation study of Princess Street through Williamsville. The area around Williamsville is growing and great care needs to be taken to plan for the future of transportation along Princess Street to ensure it meets the needs of the community.

    Princess Street is currently a very significant route for pedestrians, personal and commercial motor vehicles, transit (including express service) and cyclists. However, the width of the street is fixed and that makes it a challenge to prioritize all modes of travel on that street. This study seeks to identify the options for transportation planning to support growth in the neighbourhood and community well-being.

    For more details, background and history on the Williamsville Transportation study visit the City’s of Kingston’s public engagement hub, Get Involved Kingston. We are also seeking feedback on Green Streets in Williamsville, learn more and let us know what you think.